Tag Archive for eldred

Leddo Me Tell You Something

What is your favorite memory of Uncle Eldred?

 

I’ve thought all day on your question about my favorite memory of your uncle Eldred, and there are so many I’ve not been able to settle on just one. I don’t know whether you know this or not, but his nickname for as long as I could remember was “Leddo,” which was an extrapolation of Uncle Bubba’s way of pronouncing Eldred. MaMaw said he would say “Weddo,” and they thought that was cute, but the boys changed it to Leddo as they got older.

With all Eldred’s excellent achievements in his life, and having known many of the men whom he trained to preach who reverently referred to him as Brother Stevens, it always surprised them to hear me refer to him as Eldred, or even more if I said something about Leddo!

One such person was a young man that Eldred referred to in the last sentence I heard him utter as he was about to drive away from our house, exactly one week before his tragic death on February 20, 1979. He said, “Nier, I can’t wait for you to meet a young man from Arkansas who’s in school at Preston Road…he loves to play the guitar and sing just like you!”

That young man’s name was Randy Green and, as you know, our friendship evolved into the formation of The Sounds of Glory Quartet. To this day, Randy still refers to Eldred as Brother Stevens. I’ve wondered many times over the years if Eldred has any consciousness in Heaven about how many lives have been touched through my getting to meet that young man a week after Leddo spoke those words!

Once upon a time…

When you were growing up, who was/is the best storyteller in your family?

 
Three people come to mind as storytellers in my family for different reasons.

1. Uncle Eldred always fascinated me with stories, because he was so well-read, well-educated, well-travelled, and he incorporated all of the above into his excellence in preaching.

2. Joke telling: my brother, RJ, my Uncle Paul, and my Aunt Myrt (PawPaw’s brother & sister) All three could really keep you laughing!

3. My daddy’s stories always kept me mesmerized, because of all his life experiences…starting in 1899!

:-))

My Fair Share of Scares

What was the scariest moment you recall?

 

Hard question to answer, because a number of things come mind:

#1. When your mom and I watched that medical helicopter take off from the Huntsville airport with our daughter on board–not knowing whether she would live or lose her leg–was probably the most frightening and helpless feeling I’ve ever had.

#2. Very similar was the feeling I had just a few months after your Mom and I had married, and she developed a paralysis on one side of her body that Doctor Heath was afraid might be polio. As I stood there watching that Day Funeral Home ambulance drive off with Betty on board, I had that same scared, helpless feeling I described above.

#3. Ben gave me a couple of those scary times with his car wrecks.

#4.  Once, when flying with your Uncle Eldred in his Piper Tri-Pacer, when we had the Lubbock Airport in sight, all of a sudden the cockpit filled with smoke. The radio caught on fire (electrical fire), and we couldn’t communicate with the airport for landing instructions. Eldred started waggling the wings to let them know something was wrong. They were flashing a red light to say WAIT…we had to circle a while and wait for a green light…talk about scared–horrified was the word!  But that still didn’t came to the same level as if it were your wife…or your kids!

I Brought Home Bacon from the Piggly Wiggly

What was your very first job?

 

Dad had an interesting and very Biblical concept with regard to jobs! “As long as you’re putting your feet under my table, you have a job–because,if any won’t work, neither shall he eat!” There was  a certain amount of job security in that….cows to be fed and milked, chickens to be fed, eggs gathered, and the yard mowed.

When I first talked dad into letting me work away from home, it was a stocking job at a Perry’s Five & Dime store in Orange, Texas.  I wàs in the sixth grade I think…

#2  Gas station attendant
In high school, I worked for Brother Kendrick, one of the elders in Haynesville, La., pumping gas at his Esso gas station.  I remember gasoline cost 10 to 17 cents a gallon back then (1956).

#3  Dry goods stocker & Clerk
Next job was working for Mr. Nobel Shaw in Nacogdoches the summer of 1959 as a freshman in college. Got my first car that year also, a 1950 model flat head 8 cylinder engine.  All that freshman year, I had a job leading singing at the Mound & Starr Church of Christ.  They paid me! 🙂

#4  Grocery clerk
In 1960, my brother Eldred prevailed upon me to move to Fort Worth, live with them, attend TCU in the fall, and lead singing at the Southside Church. To help make ends meet, Eldred got me a job working for a friend of his, Jack Moulton, who was the manager of one of the Buddies Supermarkets, a grocery chain in Fort Worth.

#5  Piggly Wiggly assistant manager
In the Fall of 1960, after the Fort Worth plans didn’t work out, I found myself moving home to Dad’s in San Antonio to attend San Antonio Jr. College.   He told me that, no matter what, my bedroom was always mine; but after age 18, living at home I had to pay a boarding fee (help with the groceries I consumed). I went to the Piggly Wiggly store down the street from the folks lived and applied for a job. My experience with Buddies payed off. Before long, I’m the assistant manager in that store…which payed off for me the next year, when I moved to Madisonville in 1961 and got my job with Mr. John Dean Carter.

(A LITTLE SIDE NOTE)
Just up the street from the PW Store in San Antonio was the Jefferson Church of Christ where Uncle Paul, Aunt Eunice, and my cousin Mike attended church. Their preacher (who I met frequently in the store) was named Frank Dunn, who often had his cute little teenage daughter shopping with him.  Mike worked with me and introduced me several times.   I encountered the name Frank Dunn again in 1967, when Clyde Thompson (EX 83) told me the story of his life.  When Clyde was in prison, he was baptized by Frank Dunn, who was the preacher for the Huntsville Church of Christ.   He also married Clyde and Julia,and–to top it all off–that little girl following him in the grocery store was named Holly…the same girl who wrote ‘Daddy’s Hands’ while she was a student at ACU. Pretty cool…don’t you think?

God Bless the Workin’ Man

You mentioned your Dad worked for the railroad in Wharton.  What jobs did he have when you were growing up?

 

beasley_txWhen Nancy & I were born (1941&42), Dad owned and operated a little drugstore with a soda fountain in the little town of Beasley, Texas.  Back in those days, pharmacists didn’t have to go to college to be certified to open up a pharmacy.   Dad had worked under the supervision of an old guy by the name of Slataper who owned a drug store in Rosenberg.   I think that’s where he was working when your Uncle Bubba and Uncle RJ were born. He moved out to Beasley and started his own business there, primarily because that’s where Mama’s sister (Aunt Sally) & her husband (Uncle Henry Ellison) lived.

Mamaw’s family all stated coming to Texas from Kentucky around 1910 and by 1914 at the death of her daddy, William Benton. Her mother had died in 1908 giving birth to her 12th child, uncle Bill. Mamaw was born in 1904, Aunt Tamar in 1906 and then Uncle Bill in 1908. 
     

My daddy’s dad, known to everyone as Brother Tex (Texas Hulan Stevens), was a circuit riding farmer/ preacher in the late 1800s until his death in 1932.   Instead of a horse, he would ride from town to town on a train called the Rock Island Line…..and his middle child, Roy Stevens (1899-1969), would travel with him and lead singing for him.   It was at one of their stops at Beasley or Rosenberg that a young lady named Hallie Mae Benton caught Roy’s eye (she was 14, he was 19), and in 1919 they got married.  He was 20 and she was 15.

They lived on a farm in a little community called Fordtran down between Halletsville and Victoria. Their first baby boy was born when she was 16 and only lived a few days…. Eldred was born when she was 17, Texas Hulan (Uncle Bubba) when she was 19, and Uncle RJ when she was 23.   I, Benton Lanier,  came along when mom was 37.  When I questioned her at her 75th birthday if I was kind of an accident or a surprise, she demurely replied that I was more of a disappointment:)) She then said, “Nancy (born not quite a year later in 1942) was the surprise. I would have never had another on purpose….you were my last shot at a little girl.”

When Granddaddy (Bro. Tex) died in 1932, my daddy began preaching at some of his daddy’s appointments in places like Beasley, Rosenberg, Wharton, and Rock Island.   Many said that he truly felt a calling, not only to preach, but to try to fill his father’s shoes. In 1942 after Nancy’s birth, the 26th & North Shepherd Church of Christ in Houston called Dad to be their preacher, and he became a “full-time preacher” for the rest  of his life.
    

He taught all of his children the value of hard work and I can’t tell you how many times I heard him quote the apostle Paul, “if any won’t work, neither shall he eat!”   I often heard him say, “Always remember who you are.  Number one, you’re a Christian and number two, you’re a Stevens–in that order, and don’t you ever forget that!”

He was good at anything (as far as work was concerned ) that he tried to do.  Businessman, construction work, and one thing that sticks in my memory is his typing.   He used his 2 huge forefingers to literally make his old Underwood (desktop) typewriter sing!   He used to say, “I’m a hunt and pecker, but I want you to learn to type the right way!”   …and he made sure that Nancy and I took all the typing courses that we could in school.